Newborn Lambs Arrive at OSV just in time for School Vacation Week April 13-21

Monday, March 25, 2013

Historical Patriots' Day Celebration set for April 15

A Child's World Exhibit and Discovery Adventures

(STURBRIDGE, MA) – March 25, 2013:  Newborn lambs, including a set of twins, have already arrived at Old Sturbridge Village, with more expected in the days and weeks to come.  The lambs' arrival is a sure sign of spring – and is good news for children eager to meet them during school vacation week April 13-21. Visitors can also meet the Village oxen, cows, and chickens, learn how to churn butter, and try a variety of hands-on activities make-and-take crafts. 

Daily family-friendly performances at the Village will include music, storytelling, puppet shows, and a 19th-century magic show is set for April 17. OSV also offers Discovery Adventures during vacation week with two-day, three-day, or five-day options, giving children the chance to dress in 1830s costume and experience "A Child's Work and Play" in early New England. Museum visitors can also tour the Village's latest exhibit, A Child's World: Childhood in 19th-Century New England. For all times and details: 800-SEE-1830; www.osv.org.

On Patriots Day, April 15, Old Sturbridge Village historians will re-create the 1775 muster of the local Sturbridge militia gathering in response to the battles at Lexington and Concord that marked the start of the Revolutionary War. Young visitors (armed with wooden muskets) can join the action -- becoming "Minutemen" and "Minutewomen" and learning to march and drill with the militia.  Fifers and drummers will play throughout the day, and visitors can meet a "patriot" from the nation's oldest commissioned war ship, "Old Ironsides." The USS Constitution surgeon will be on hand, in full 1812 naval regalia, to describe life and the practice of medicine aboard the historic vessel.

The museum's current exhibit, A Child's World: Childhood in 19th-Century New England marks the first time that more than 150 rare child-related artifacts from the Old Sturbridge Village collection are on display together. Highlights of the exhibit include toys, games, puzzles, portraits, clothing, furniture, toy soldiers and antique dolls. The Child's World exhibit is entering its final weeks, and is on view only through Memorial Day, May 27.

Children who participate in OSV's "A Child's Work and Play" Discovery Adventures during April school vacation (April 15-19) get to wear period clothing and experience first-hand what it was like to be a kid in the early 19th-century. They will learn how children had fun and also how indispensable farm girls and boys were to the family work force.  Activities include cooking over the hearth, sewing, preparing a kitchen garden, making their own toy, learning old-fashioned stories and games, and attending a 19th-century magic show.

Old Sturbridge Village celebrates New England life in the 1830s and is open from 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. seven days a week. Admission: adults $24; seniors $22; children 3-17, $8; children 2 and under, free. All programs are subject to change. Each admission includes free parking and a free second-day visit within 10 days. Woo Card subscribers get $5 off adult daytime admission; college Woo cardholders receive $12 off adult daytime admission. For times and details of all OSV activities visit: www.osv.org or call 1-800-SEE-1830.

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Sidebar
Did You Know?

  • A daily highlight at Old Sturbridge Village is seeing the sheep and lambs – who are hungry for supper -- run through the Common from pasture to barn, where they are fed. Visitors affectionately call this end-of-the-day tradition the "running of the lambs."
  • The Old Sturbridge Village sheep are Gulf Coast Natives -- a heritage breed dating back to the arrival of Spanish settlers in the New World in the 1500s. These sheep most closely resemble the Merino sheep raised on New England farms in the early 19th century.
  • Lambs rejected by their mothers who have to be fed by hand are called "cosset" lambs. Probably Mary's little lamb from the famous poem, whose "fleece was white as snow" was tame because it was being raised by hand.

Contact:
Ann Lindblad 508-347-0323; 508-886-2689 cell
alindblad@osv.org

 

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